Webb and Geach Explored-Caradon Copper Mine

CaradonCopperPan
Caradon Copper Mine seen from the footpath in 2005

Page 99 of Trevithick Society’s reprint of Webb and Geach’s book ‘The history and progress of mining in the Liskeard and Caradon District’ ,  provides the starting point for this post, a virtual exploration of the Caradon Copper Mine.

Caradon Copper Mine

“To work these an engine was erected with all necessary buildings; but though the shaft was sunk to a good depth; and the mine worked for some years, a corresponding success was not met with, and they eventually sold the machinery and abandoned the concern.” Webb and Geach

Ordnance Survey Cornwall XXVIII.SW Surveyed: 1881 to 1882 Published: 1886

CaradonCopper1882
Produced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland

Click here for the Map on Library of Scotland website>

Current OS map

CaradonCopperOS2016To see the location on a current OS map click here>

 

 

 

Google Maps

CaradonCopperGoogle2016Click here to explore the map>

 

 

 

 

Google Street View

Cornwall Council

Cornwall Council interactive map>

CaradonCopperCornwallReference : MCO11918
Name : CARADON – Post Medieval mine
Monument type : MINE
Period : Post Medieval
Form : EXTANT STRUCTURE
Summary : Caradon copper mine commenced work in 1844, was renamed Trethevy Copper Mine in 1849 and was disused by 1863


wpid-wp-1441052784407.pngFor Webb and Geach and other John Manley’s books-click here>

 

WEBB & GEACH EXPLORED-Liskeard Consols

This virtual journey of exploration based on Webb and Geach’s book ‘The history and progress of mining in the Liskeard and Caradon District’ ,  continues with another of the small mines described in the Trevithick Society’s reprint of the Victorian publication. This post covers the first of the mines described on page 99. 

Liskeard Consols

“…a mine situate a little south of the patch of greenstone forming St. Cleer Downs, was worked a few years since by a Liskeard Company, but after an incomplete trial it was abandoned.” Webb and Geach

Cornwall XXXVI.NW (includes: Liskeard Borough; Menheniot; St Cleer.) Surveyed: 1881 to 1882, Published: 1887

LiskeardConsols OS 1887
Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland

Click here for the Map on Library of Scotland website>

Current OS map

LiskeardConsols OS 2016

To see the location on a current OS map click here>

 

 

 

Google Maps

Click here to explore the map>

LiskeardConsolsGoogle2016

Google Street view

Cornwall Council

Cornwall Council interactive map>

LiskeardConsolsCornwallReference : MCO56307
Name : LISKEARD CONSOLS – C19 mine
Monument type : BLACKSMITHS WORKSHOP, MINE, MINERS CHANGING HOUSE?
Period : Post Medieval
Form : DOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE, EARTHWORK, EXTANT BUILDING
Summary : Liskeard Consols was worked between 1841 and 1844. All that remains of the site is a depression at the location of a shaft, and a cottage that is likely to have been either the smith’s shop or possibly the ‘dry’ or changing house for the mine.

Click here for the Heritage Gateway entry>


wpid-wp-1441052784407.png

For Webb and Geach and other John Manley’s books-click here>

 

Webb & Geach Explored-Wheal Venland

This virtual journey of exploration based on Webb and Geach’s book ‘The history and progress of mining in the Liskeard and Caradon District’ ,  continues with another of the small mines described on page 98 of the Trevithick Society’s reprint of the Victorian publication.

 

Wheal Venland

” …..Up went the shares, which were sold for fabulous amount, as also were the unfortunate purchasers, who soon found that the ore was cut out without leaving a trace of its existence.” Webb & Geach

Ordnance Survey Cornwall XXVIII.SW (includes: St Cleer.)
Surveyed: 1881 to 1882 Published: 1886

Wheal Venland Os 1886
Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland

Click here for the Map on Library of Scotland website>

Current OS map

Venland OS 2016To see the location  current OS Maps Click here>

 

 

 

 

Google maps

Click here to explore the map>

 

Venland Google 2016

Google Street View

Cornwall Council

Cornwall Council interactive map

Reference : MCO38682
Name : WHEAL VENLAND – Post Medieval mine
Monument type : MINEVenland Cornwall Map Cau
Period : Post Medieval
Form : EXTANT STRUCTURE

X COORD : 225450
Y COORD : 68100

Click here for Heritage Gateway entry>


wpid-wp-1441052784407.pngFor Webb and Geach and other John Manley’s books-click here>

 

Webb and Geach explored-St. Cleer Consols

Now that the two talks on William West and John Taylor have been and gone, this blog will go exploring. Using Webb and Geach’s book ‘The history and progress of mining in the Liskeard and Caradon District’ as a base it will wander around the internet looking for clues for lost Cornish mines. This is the first of the series, so it is a bit of an experiment in layout and sources, please enjoy exploring the Cornish mines, wherever you are.

I have resisted the temptation to start at the obvious, the well known successful mines, and instead gone for the most obscure. Hidden away in page 98 of the Trevithick Society’s reprint of the Victorian publication  is some short descriptions of the small, failed attempts at mining in the district. Under the heading of ‘Miscellaneous’, these four pages refer to some of the most interesting mines in the area.

” Some mines of very great promises were abandoned through want of further outlay, which the then shareholders were unwilling to expend. In others the adventurers, not finding courses of ore at a comparatively shallow depth became disheartened” Webb and Geach


Saint Cleer Consols

“…..a short cross-cut adit appears to have been driven on a lode of no great promise.” Webb and Geach page 98

Ordnance Survey Cornwall XXVIII.SW (includes: St Cleer.)
Surveyed: 1881 to 1882 Published: 1886

St Cleer Consols OS
Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland

One possible shaft is shown close west of the lane.

Click here for the Map on Library of Scotland website>

Current OS map

St Cleer Consols 2016To see the location  current OS Maps Click here>

 

 

Google maps

Click here to explore the map>

St CleerGoogle2016

Google Street View

TrecombeChapel-Googleearth2016

Image capture May 2009 CO 2016 Google earth

Cornwall Council

Cornwall Council interactive map

St Cleer Consols Cornwall Council 2016

PRN (CORNWALL) : 14071
SITE NAME : ST CLEER CONSOLS
SITE TYPE : MINE
FORM : EXTANT
EPOCH : Post-Medieval
PERIOD : 19
MRO INDEX : 1
SOURCE : CC-A11
X COORD : 225500
Y COORD : 68950

 

British Geological Survey

Geological Map>

St Cleer Geology 338

Open Government Licence, Contains British Geological Survey materials © NERC 2016


More mines to come over the next few months, so if you have enjoyed this armchair exploring follow this blog.

John Taylor’s mines -A quick list

Navsbooks>John Taylor> Mines

Here is a list of mine’s extracted from Roger Burt’s biography of John Taylor. It’s a ‘quick and dirty’  attempt to summarise Taylor’s mining interests, so I am sure its not complete, and not fully verified. I have posted however, as it is a useful reference and shows the scale of his activity. If you have any more mines to add, please comment to the post .

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The West Devon Mines
Wheal Friendship,
Crebor
Crowndale

The Cornish Mines
Poolgooth
Pembroke
Crinnins
East Crinnis
United Mines
Wheal Spavner
Penandrea
Wheel Busy
Tongues
Tolgus
Mellanear
Wheal Grenville
Wheal Buller
Wheal Sparnon
Wheal Beauchamp
Wheal Busy
United Hills
Polberro consols 1848

Rest of Britain
Halkyn mountain Flintshire.
Ecton copper mine
Grassington Moor
Alston Moor
Lisburne mid Wales
Frongoch mine
Logaulas – Lisburne mine
Glogfach-Lisburne mine
Glogfawr-Lisburne mine
Goginan Mines mid Wales,
Darren mones
Cwmsymlog mines
Cwymystwyth mine 1848
Alport Mining Company
Longstone Edge
Huberdale
Magpie Mine
Coniston copper mine

Beyond Britain
British Real design Monte Company
Real del Monte silver mines.
Balanos mining company, Mexico.
Nouveau Mond
Linares Lead Mining Company

A John Taylor book is now available on Kindle

Brenton Symons’ Victorian Map of the Liskeard Mining District-page complete

A chance to present Brenton Symons’ cartography to the Caradon Geology group was great opportunity to get some feedback on its geology. Normally my audience are Cornish mining history experts, so discussions on rocks made a change to delving into the details of engine houses.

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In attempting to understand the strength and weakness of map my focus was on its intended customers; the potential mine investors. My talk at Liskeard brought to light an alternative view point however, that is the current buyers of geological maps. No longer is it the extraction of wealth beneath the ground that attracts geological interests but the ability to build on its surface. Instead of mining investors there are civil engineers; housing estates, supermarkets, wind turbines and road improvements have replaced shafts, stopes and adits.

Now that the talk is complete, I have launched a new page dedicated to the map, a page that includes an index to my posts on the Liskeard map. Click here to view.

Time to move on to the next presentation. A presentation about a genius in the British Mining industry who died in the year that Brenton Symons published his map,1863.  The genius that was John Taylor will be the topic of the next series of blogs.

Overlayed old and new maps of Caradon Hill mines

These images have been grabbed with my small Kindle Fire in ‘iffy’ lighting, and therefore they are not the best quality. Despite of this limitation they should be of interest to anyone attempting to relate the Victorian mines with the modern landscape of the Liskeard Area in Cornwall.

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The map extracts show Brenton Symons’ 1863 geological map overlayed on a modern OS 1:25000 map. This overlay was produced as part of my research into William West, the last great Cornish Engineer, and the artwork is not of the neatest quality as it was never intended for the final product to be published. However, the information displayed is far too useful to remain hidden away in the bottom of my map drawers.

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Lodes, cross-courses, elvans and sett boundaries have been transferred, but due to scale restrictions I have not drawn on the mines’ surface buildings. The map was drawn by making use of the field boundaries that have remained in place between 1863 and 2014. In doing so the discrepancies between map datums have been removed.

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For those wanting a closer poke around the map a complete overlay will be on display at the Caradon Geology group talk at Liskeard, February 2015.

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Once my laptop is re-united with my scanner, some better quality images will be obtained for this blog.

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As the Caradon Geology Group talk draws nearer, this series of postings about Brenton Symon’s map is almost complete. Just a few loose ends to tie up, and then it will be back to the realm of Cornish Engineers. With of course, some dives into rabbit holes of maps along the way.

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To see Brenton Symons’ map, download a copy of my Kindle Book of the Liskeard Mining District of 1863 from Amazon, or ask for a CD ROM copy from the Book Seller at Liskeard.